Rebellion founders to keynote Develop:Brighton 2019

first_imgRebellion founders to keynote Develop:Brighton 2019Jason and Chris Kingsley will discuss the studio’s history, smash hits like Sniper Elite and their ventures into comics and filmJames BatchelorEditor-in-ChiefWednesday 3rd April 2019Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleTandem EventsThe organisers of Develop:Brighton have announced the first keynote speakers for this year’s conference.Rebellion co-founders Jason and Chris Kingsley will kick off the final day of event with fireside chat entitled ‘Rebellion: The Path to Independence.’ In this session, they will discuss the studio’s 26-year history, the creation of some of its biggest games like recent releases Strange Brigade and Sniper Elite 4, and how the company has branched into other media over the years. In addition to games, Rebellion runs comics brand 2000 AD and last year opened a film and television studio.The brothers join a speaker line-up that already has representatives of BioWare, Riot Games, Ubisoft, Eidos Montreal, Rovio, Jagex and more.More keynotes and speakers will be announced in the coming weeks.Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games Develop:Brighton 2019 runs from Tuesday, July 9 to Thursday, July 11 and will once again be held at the Brighton Hilton Metropole.Today is the deadline for the Super Early Bird rate on all passes, and GamesIndustry.biz readers can gain an extra 10% off with the code NWGMBL. You can purchase your tickets at the conference website.Today is also the deadline for entries into the Develop:Star Awards, the new ceremony designed to honour the best in development talent. You can find out more about the nomination process at the awards website.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesGamesIndustry.biz to host David Braben keynote at Develop:Brighton 2019Frontier Developments CEO will discuss the studio’s 25-year history with our own Chris DringBy James Batchelor A year agoSean Murray to keynote Develop:Brighton 2019Hello Games founder will reflect on developing No Man’s Sky and discuss the future of the studioBy James Batchelor A year agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

Konami looks West with its new external publishing programme

first_imgKonami looks West with its new external publishing programmeRichard Jones discusses the publisher’s new initiative and how it’s diversifying its portfolio with games from and for Western marketsMarie DealessandriAcademy WriterWednesday 3rd June 2020Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareCompanies in this articleKonamiKonami is taking a new turn to strengthen its position in Western markets by launching an external publishing programme aiming at diversifying its portfolio.Mobile, PES and esports have long been the pillars of Konami, but the publisher is now ready to step out of its comfort zone, following in Bandai Namco’s footsteps — another Japanese company that switched its focus to Western IPs in the past few years with titles such as Tarsier’s Little Nightmares and Supermassive’s Dark Pictures Anthology. Western markets have already started to feel like a bigger focus at Konami, with PES’ rebrand meant to help the series in Europe for instance. But this is now part of a wider strategy.”The drive is towards publishing more titles from Western studios,” Richard Jones, senior European brand and business development manager at Konami, tells GamesIndustry.biz. “So the focus for the European team is domestic audiences. Obviously everyone knows Konami, we have studios and teams in Japan, we have many well-known, well loved IPs. They’re all being managed and looked after by our studios in Japan, and what we’re looking for is complementary titles, to build the portfolio with things that perhaps [are] new to Konami — Western titles for Western audiences.”Konami has enjoyed a period of notable growth in the past few years, mainly coming from its success in Asia with its historical IPs — and it can now use this growth to explore new ideas elsewhere, which is a significant move for the publisher.”What we’re looking for is complementary titles, to build the portfolio with things that perhaps [are] new to Konami” The new initiative kicked off yesterday with the release of Skelattack, an indie platformer developed by Californian studio Ukuza. It has been the work in progress of a dozen of developers on GameMaker for the past four years — it was initially the passion project of art director David Stanley, who developed the game single-handedly for a couple of years before being picked up by Ukuza.But while Skelattack’s history and scale are a clear sign that Konami is stepping out of AAA, the publisher’s new initiative won’t be limited to small projects. “I guess the reason we’re talking about smaller titles is because the first title we announced is Skelattack, which is obviously an indie title,” Jones says. “I think one of the reasons we’re looking to those types of smaller teams is just that there’s so much creativity out there with those guys — you know, teams working on small but ambitious titles. Those guys are the ones daring to do innovative games, and I think that’s something very exciting, which we wanted to support as a publisher.Ukuza’s Skelattack kicked off Konami’s external publishing programme”[But] I think the criteria we’re looking for really is similar across all new IP regardless of size. Maybe some of those criteria become amplified with the smaller projects. I’m thinking specifically of people coming with fresh ideas, and teams that are pushing existing genres in new ways, or coming up with something genuinely unique. There’s just so much going on in this flourishing indie scene at the moment that I think it’s only natural that we’re looking at small teams and small titles, as well as other titles.”In Skelettack, players don’t try to defeat some villains — they are the villains, defending their land “from the invading human threat.” This original take on classic platformer tropes is one of the reasons Konami got excited by the project when they met with Ukuza at GDC last year.”There’s so much going on in this indie scene that I think it’s only natural that we’re looking at small teams” “It was one of those classic stories of ‘publisher meets developer’ — we liked the team, we liked Skelattack, we thought the art, the music and the tone were really nice,” Jones continues. “That was all there to see in the early build that they showed us. And we could see that they had a vision of where they wanted to take the game, and where they wanted to take the studio as well. It just seemed like a very good fit for a positive collaborative partnership between us.”You can read more about Ukuza’s vision for Skelettack, and particularly its art style, on the GamesIndustry.biz Academy.And if the game is a hit, Konami could continue supporting Ukuza going forward, though Jones is cautious in his answer as Konami’s US teams have been driving this specific project.”I think anything is possible. One of the nice things about working with people that you get on with, people you share a creative vision with, is it becomes easy working together. So I would like to say that we’re looking for long term partners [in Ukuza]… If that pans out then that would be fantastic.”Richard Jones, KonamiBut ultimately, it is a long-term strategy that Konami is forging. Whether or not it continues partnering with Ukuza doesn’t change the overall vision, and its desire to bring more Western IPs to market.”We’re in for the long haul,” Jones says. “We’re only now just going public with this, with the release of Skelattack, [but] I’m sure you can imagine that this has been planned for months. So, right now, we’re looking at short and mid-term titles that need funding and publishing support to realise their potential. I think long-term, from my perspective, it’s about forming creative partnerships with studios. It’s about bringing original projects to fruition. This is something that we’re keen to invest in and are willing to put time and resources into.”We are looking at this long-term, but we understand that in order to get to that point, there are steps along the path. We’ve been talking to many people, we have a few irons in the fire if you like, and hopefully you’ll see some of those come to fruition in the not too distant future.”While Konami is looking for studios across the Western market, Jones is personally keen to focus on European studios.”Purely from a logistical point of view to start with — we’re a small team and in order to manage these projects it makes sense if we’re working in similar time zones,” he says. “So that’s why we’re focused on Europe. It’s our primary market. As a larger company it’s a question of putting the right resources into the right regions. That’s not to say that we’re blind to the other markets as well. Skelattack initially was the passion project of Ukuza’s art director David Stanley”If we can find European studios, partner with those guys and publish them globally that’s a win-win for everyone. Another thing that Konami in particular can bring to the party is our Japanese and Asian arm. We’re very well established there and [we] can offer a route into Japan.”Through this new external publishing programme, Konami is also keen to show that the publisher route is still valid. While being able to self-publish was seen as the holy grail for a long time, the opposite trend has made a comeback. It’s never been easier to publish a game, meaning that having a publisher to help you with discovery issues is popular again.Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games “What we can offer is an established route to market, and that might be attractive to certain studios,” Jones says. “Now don’t get me wrong, in this day and age there are many routes to market. It’s no longer one size fits all, but the publisher route is still valid.”There’s lots of publishers out there doing this and we’re not saying that we’re gonna be able to do this and do everything better than those guys, but I think what we do have is a global infrastructure, we have experience in going to market, hopefully we have a legacy as well, that people will be into. “Our hope is that these things which we can offer might be a good option or a good fit for certain development partners. From the beginning of this process, we’ve been clear with ourselves that we want to put the developers first. Developers generally want to focus on development. The commercial side is not something which all studios want or need to have in-house. And I think that’s where perhaps the more traditional publisher/developer relationship could work, because we can bring our expertise to those guys and allow them to do what they’re best at, which is making games.”Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Publishing & Retail newsletter and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesKonami skipping E3 2021Publisher says it won’t be ready to participate in all-digital show, but is “in deep development on a number of key projects”By Brendan Sinclair 8 days agoNexon invests $874m in Bandai Namco, Konami, Sega and HasbroMore investments to come as part of $1.5 billion initiative to support “overlooked and undervalued” entertainment firmsBy James Batchelor A month agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more