Often Nonprofit Hospitals Fail To Let Consumers Know About Charity Care Options

first_img Nationally, more health care providers are embracing the direct-pay, or “concierge medicine,” model. A Physicians’ Foundation 2014 survey found 7 percent of doctors run a direct-pay practice and another 13 percent plan to transition to some form of direct-pay model. (Rini, 11/16) USA Today/The (Wilmington, Del.) News Journal: More Doctors Offering Direct-Pay Health Care For municipal-bond buyers, the boost from Obamacare is waning. Quarterly results from U.S. hospital chains such as HCA Holdings Inc. — which make more frequent disclosures than non-profit competitors — suggest financial gains from the federal law are growing more limited, according to Barclays Plc. That provides an early look at a trend that may also affect non-profit hospitals, whose municipal bonds have rallied, delivering 16 percent returns in the past two years as the providers were stuck with fewer unpaid bills. (Braun, 11/13) Often Nonprofit Hospitals Fail To Let Consumers Know About Charity Care Options Many hospitals are supposed to let patients know if they qualify for free or reduced-price care. Also in the news, a survey finds a growing numbers of physicians are moving to concierge care, employees are picking up a bigger share of their health care costs and the health law’s impact on the municipal bond market is waning. This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. A lot of people who don’t have health insurance worry about getting hit with huge bills if they go to the hospital. Most consumers probably don’t realize that many hospitals are supposed to let you know if you qualify for free or reduced-price care–and charge you fairly, even if you don’t have insurance. But a recent study found that less than half of nonprofit hospitals surveyed were telling patients they could be eligible for charity care. (Sun, 11/13) center_img The Washington Post: How Nonprofit Hospitals Overcharge The (Under And) Uninsured Bloomberg: Fading Obamacare Gains Put Drag On 16% Hospital Muni-Bond Rally The runaway train of rising health-care costs has slowed, but you’re forgiven if you haven’t noticed: New research shows that employees are contributing a record amount toward their coverage, a trend that experts say is likely to continue as high-deductible plans and stingier benefits become more commonplace. (White, 11/13) NBC News: Workers Shoulder Bigger Portion Of Health Care Costs, Study Finds last_img read more

Drug Prices Expected To Spike Even Higher In 2017 Experts Predict

first_img CBS News: Prognosis For Rx In 2017: More Painful Drug-Price Hikes The rising cost of drugs for rare and complex conditions that come from pharmaceutical companies’ newest research continues to squeeze Virginia’s Medicaid program, two new state reports suggest. The average spent on specialty drugs for people covered by Medicaid’s traditional “fee-for-service” coverage rose by more than 14 percent last year, to $12,938 per recipient, the state Department of Medical Assistance Services’ annual review for the General Assembly reported. Medicaid, a joint federal-state program, provides health coverage for low-income children, seniors and people with disabilities. (Ress, 12/29) Pharmaceutical executives have been in the hot seat, recently facing Congressional outrage over the cost of life-saving drugs, and President-elect Trump has promised action. What is behind these price tags? And if government intervened to lower them, would there be un-intended consequences? (1/2) The Motley Fool: The Most Expensive Drugs Of 2016 Prescription drug prices have gotten out of control for many Americans and many insurers. Some drugs cost as much as premium sports cars. Here are the five most expensive prescription drugs in 2016 as compiled by prescription drug comparison website GoodRx — and which companies are profiting from them. (Speights, 12/30) NewYorkUpstate.com: NY Step Therapy Law To Boost Prescription Drug Costs By As Much As $530M, Insurers Say Stat: The Generic EpiPen Isn’t Winning Over First Responders. They’ve Found Cheaper Options A new state law that took effect Jan. 1 that curbs the ability of insurers to use “step therapy” will boost prescription drug costs in New York by as much as $530 million, according to an estimate by an insurance industry group. The New York Health Plan Association criticized Gov. Andrew Cuomo for signing on New Year’s Eve a bill that reforms a practice used by insurers to force patients to use the least expensive drug first, even if a patient’s doctor believes a different drug is more appropriate. (Mulder, 1/3) If there’s a remedy for rising drug costs, it’s not likely to be available to many Americans in 2017. Prescription drug costs for Americans under 65 years old are projected to jump 11.6 percent in 2017, or at a quicker pace than the 11.3 percent price increase in 2016, according to consulting firm Segal Consulting. Older Americans won’t get much of a break: Their drug costs are projected to rise 9.9 percent next year, compared with 10.9 percent in 2016. By comparison, wages are expected to rise just 2.5 percent in 2017. (Picchi, 12/30) Stat: Q&A: Vermont Legislator Says Drug Pricing Law Is The Start Of A ‘Long Battle’ Drug Prices Expected To Spike Even Higher In 2017, Experts Predict News outlets report on stories related to pharmaceutical drug pricing.center_img This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. As EpiPen prices soared in recent years, emergency medical responders across the country started to ditch the auto-injectors in favor of regular syringes. And it doesn’t look like the arrival of a generic EpiPen will change their minds. (Swetlitz, 12/29) The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first drug to treat patients with spinal muscular atrophy, a savage disease that, in its most severe form, kills infants before they turn 2. “This is a miracle — seriously,” Dr. Mary K. Schroth, a lung specialist in Madison, Wis., who treats children who have the disease, said of the approval, which was made last week. “This is a life-changing event, and this will change the course of this disease.” Dr. Schroth has previously worked as a paid consultant to Biogen, which is selling the drug. The drug, called Spinraza, will not come cheap — and, by some estimates, will be among the most expensive drugs in the world. (Thomas, 12/30) Daily Press: Specialty Drug Prices Continue To Pressure Medicaid New Hampshire Public Radio: What’s Driving The Cost Of Prescription Drugs & Why Do Americans Pay More? The New York Times: Costly Drug For Fatal Muscular Disease Wins F.D.A. Approval A new Vermont law—the first of its kind in the U.S.—aims to shine a light on the murky world of prescription-drug pricing by requiring manufacturers to justify big increases. But the transparency push has its limits, as seen in the first report that Vermont officials prepared based on the drugmakers’ explanations. (Loftus, 12/31) Last June, Vermont became the first state in the country to pass a law requiring drug makers to justify their price hikes. The move, which was opposed by the pharmaceutical industry, was borne out of frustration that the federal government had not acted on the rising cost of prescription medicines. … We spoke with Chris Pearson, a Vermont legislator who was vice chair of the House Committee on Health Care and championed the bill, about the results and where this is headed. (Silverman, 1/3) The Wall Street Journal: Drug Pricing Report Shows Limits Of Transparency Push last_img read more

Listen Up There is Now 43 off the Q Acoustics M2 Soundbar

first_imgDeals The Q Acoustics M2 Soundbar’s compact design also means its perfect for slipping in where you please. Whether you want it to sit beneath your TV or tucked away, its shape allows for endless possibilities. That said, our Trusted Reviews tip is: “Keep the M2 as close to the centre and bottom of the TV as possible… having it below the TV, the disconnect between picture and sound felt odd. This soundbase really belongs right under the picture.”When it comes down to it, this soundbar is a nifty little addition to your entertainment system. No need to find the room for large surround sound speakers (or the cash, for that matter), the Q Acoustics M2 Soundbar is now nearly half its RRP at just £169. And let’s face it, any chance to show up your friends by having the best entertainment system in town is always worth it.For more amazing offers, follow us @TrustedDealsUKWe may earn a commission if you click a deal and buy an item. That’s why we want to make sure you’re well-informed and happy with your purchase, so that you’ll continue to rely on us for your buying advice needs. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Whether you’re looking to upgrade the sound when watching TV or creating that ultimate home cinema experience, or you simply want to take centre stage at your own personal concert, the Q Acoustics M2 Soundbar can bring the heat. Adopting an 80w amplifier with a BMR design to ensure a complete one-eighty all-consuming sound, the M2 Soundbar also boasts its very own built-in subwoofer to ensure you get a true-sound bass that’ll have your whole home vibrating.Its MoviEQ feature means it can adapt the sound it transmits, equalising soundtracks and effects to create a truly captivating viewing experience. The soundbar also comes with Bluetooth connectivity, or NFC for Android, allowing you to bop along to the music of your choice. Best Q Acoustics Soundbar DealsQ Acoustics M2 Soundbar with Built-in Subwoofer – BlackAchieve incredible sound in your home, both as a part of your audio and home entertainment set-up. Creating immersive sound ideal for movie nights, the subwoofer also allows for the production of depth-filled baselines.Amazon|Save £130|Now £169.00View DealNow £169.00|Save £130|AmazonQ Acoustics M3 Soundbar with Built-in Subwoofer – BlackGot a bit more cash to spare? Why not splash out on the M3, providing a true plug-in experience, meaning you can set it up with the rest of your entertainment system and forget about it. With a higher quality of sound and even more powerful subwoofer, it might just be worth the extra pennies spent.Amazon|Save £70|Now £169.00View DealNow £169.00|Save £70|Amazoncenter_img Avoid that £300 price tag, but still reap all the benefits of the supreme, even sound of the Q Acoustics M2 Soundbar, now with a huge £130 slash in price over on Amazon. Introduce the Q Acoustics M2 Soundbar and create an even more immersive experience, upgrading the way you hear audio. Down to just £169, jump on this almost half price reduction and make waves with your new sound system set-up. Best Q Acoustics Soundbar DealsQ Acoustics M2 Soundbar with Built-in Subwoofer – BlackAchieve incredible sound in your home, both as a part of your audio and home entertainment set-up. Creating immersive sound ideal for movie nights, the subwoofer also allows for the production of depth-filled baselines.Amazon|Save £130|Now £169.00View DealNow £169.00|Save £130|AmazonQ Acoustics M3 Soundbar with Built-in Subwoofer – BlackGot a bit more cash to spare? Why not splash out on the M3, providing a true plug-in experience, meaning you can set it up with the rest of your entertainment system and forget about it. With a higher quality of sound and even more powerful subwoofer, it might just be worth the extra pennies spent.Amazon|Save £70|Now £169.00View DealNow £169.00|Save £70|Amazon We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

Back to School Deal Bag a Touchscreen Chromebook Laptop with £70 off

first_imgWe’ll be honest, this isn’t a laptop that’ll perform incredibly, and if you want to edit photos and video or play games, you’re looking at the wrong laptop. But it’s a great price for what is here, and if you go in with your eyes open it’s a great deal. Want to stay up to date with Amazon Prime Day 2019? We’ve got you covered. For more amazing offers, follow us @TrustedDealsUKWe may earn a commission if you click a deal and buy an item. That’s why we want to make sure you’re well-informed and happy with your purchase, so that you’ll continue to rely on us for your buying advice needs. But what does it have going on? On the outside, you’ve got a 14 inch touchscreen display with a 180-degree hinge giving you some versatility to how you’re using it, while USB C ports offer up fast charging and compatibility with a wide range of chargers.The biggest headline feature tucked away beneath the shell is the 10 hour battery life. Elsewhere, it’s slightly less impressive, with just a 32GB hard drive and 4GB of RAM, but this isn’t supposed to be a top of the range laptop. It’s a solid performer for those who just want to browse social media and do some light work. This is nearly perfect for taking notes or writing essays, as there’s no distractions. Meanwhile the Intel® Celeron® N3350 Processor should keep your web browser nice and smooth.  ASUS 14″ inch Chromebook — a perfect back to school dealASUS C423NA Touch 14″ Intel® Celeron™ Chromebook – 32 GB eMMC, SilverThis budget Chromebook can handle Google docs, YouTube and more, at a price that works for students and kids going back to schoolCurrys PC World|Save £70|Now £259.00View DealNow £259.00|Save £70|Currys PC World We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time.center_img Deals Need a lightweight laptop with a big battery? Currys have the deal for you, with a great price on this ASUS Chromebook, perfect for light users or kids and students heading back to the learn-grind after summer. This is a perfect back to school offer, letting you snag an Asus Chromebook with a touchscreen for just £259, saving you £70. ASUS 14″ inch Chromebook — a perfect back to school dealASUS C423NA Touch 14″ Intel® Celeron™ Chromebook – 32 GB eMMC, SilverThis budget Chromebook can handle Google docs, YouTube and more, at a price that works for students and kids going back to schoolCurrys PC World|Save £70|Now £259.00View DealNow £259.00|Save £70|Currys PC World Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorlast_img read more

Morgan Stanley to buy Canadian employee stock manager Solium for 11 billion

first_img Twitter Join the conversation → Bloomberg News Sonali Basak February 11, 20199:13 AM EST Filed under News FP Street Comment Facebook Share this storyMorgan Stanley to buy Canadian employee stock manager Solium for $1.1 billion — a 43% premium Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn 0 Comments More What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generationcenter_img Email Morgan Stanley agreed to buy Solium Capital Inc. in a bid to add younger clients and tech startups to its stock-plan administration business.The firm will pay $19.15 a share in cash, according to a statement Monday, or about 43 per cent higher than Solium’s closing price on Friday. The agreement values Solium at about $1.1 billion (US$900 million).Morgan Stanley will add Calgary-based Solium’s 3,000 stock-plan clients and 1 million participants to its rival offering, which has 320 clients and 1.5 million participants. Solium’s clients include such startups as Stripe Inc., Instacart Inc. and Shopify Inc., giving Morgan Stanley’s investment bankers a chance to pitch those firms capital-raising ideas, while its advisers court tech workers as they start to accumulate wealth. It’s official: Wall Street just made $100 billion for the first time ever World’s biggest money manager expects Bank of Canada to hit the brakes in 2019 Men on Wall Street are so spooked by the #MeToo movement they’re avoiding women at all costs The large premium Morgan Stanley agreed to pay “might raise a brow, but we think this makes significant strategic sense,” analysts at Evercore ISI said in a note, adding that the link-up “provides a real path towards the organic growth and next generation of clients that many investors have been questioning.”Shares of Morgan Stanley rose 0.9 per cent to US$41.17 in early trading at 9:07 a.m.The Wall Street bank entered into a partnership with Solium in 2016 to administer equity-compensation plans for its corporate clients and their employees. The deal announced Monday won’t affect Morgan Stanley’s buyback plans, and is expected to be completed in the second quarter, according to the statement.“The acquisition provides Morgan Stanley with broader access to corporate clients and a direct channel to their employees, as well as a greater opportunity to establish and develop relationships with a younger demographic and service this population early in their wealth accumulation years,” Chief Executive Officer James Gorman said in the statement.Bloomberg.com ← Previous Next → Reddit Morgan Stanley headquarters in New York is seen on March 1, 2017. U.S. bank Morgan Stanley has signed a deal to buy Solium Capital Inc. in a deal valued at about $1.1 billion.Mark Lennihan/AP/The Canadian Press Morgan Stanley to buy Canadian employee stock manager Solium for $1.1 billion — a 43% premium Morgan Stanley wants to add younger clients and tech startups to its stock-plan administration business Sponsored By: Featured Stories advertisementlast_img read more

Nissan Adds Albon To Formula E Driver Lineup Joins Buemi

Check Out The Works BMW Formula E Car The 22-year-old Anglo-Thai is currently third in the F2 standings with e.dams’ non-electric arm DAMS.“The level of competition in the series is intense, and I’m looking forward to testing myself against some of the best drivers in the world,” Albon said.“Electric street racing will be a new challenge for me, but working with Sebastien as my teammate will be a huge help, as he has set the benchmark for performance in the series.”Nissan is taking over the e.dams entry from its sister brand from the 2018/19 season, and announced earlier this year that it would be dispensing with Nicolas Prost as Buemi’s teammate.The announcement of Albon’s drive was also official confirmation that Buemi would be staying on through the Renault to Nissan transition as expected.Team principal Jean-Paul Driot said: “Sebastien has been an important part of the e.dams team since our first Formula E race four years ago in China.“We know Alex well from his performances with DAMS in Formula 2, and we’re excited to bring his talent into the Formula E championship.”Nissan e.dams had been linked to an array of other drivers since Prost’s exit was announced, and recently confirmed it had been in talks with NIO FE racer Oliver Turvey. Source: Motorsport Watch A Tesla Race A Superbike, Formula 1 Car, Jet, Airplane & More Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on September 27, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Sims Joins da Costa In BMW Formula E Line-up Albon has already had an FE test with the team when it was running as Renault’s works operation.More Formula E News Nissan e.dams has picked Formula 2 frontrunner Alexander Albon for its debut Formula E season, alongside 2015/16 champion Sebastien Buemi. read more

BYD Launches New Yuan EV535 Electric SUV

first_imgLots more electric range than the previous Yuan.BYD formally released a set of photos of the new BYD Yuan EV535 all-electric SUV a few days ago, which will be available for presale in the middle of January.More China News Let’s Look At CATL’s Numerous Battery Deals According to published photos, the BYD Yuan EV535 looks basically same as the existing model. Featuring BYD’s latest iconic “Dragon Face” design, the new model has a very stylish front face which carries a grille resembling a mouth agape that is flanked by slim headlights.The side of the new all-electric SUV features a pair of character lines of which the upper one stretches from the front wheel to the rear end, visually lengthening the car body to some degree. Meanwhile, lines located above the wheel arch can change shape depending on the viewing angle.As to the interior, the Yuan EV535 is greatly different from the outgoing model. The interior looking similar to that of the all-new BYD Tang enable a rather clean look. Besides, a large-sized display at the center console flanked by circular air conditioners creates both futuristic sense and sports essence.Overall, the BYD Yuan EV535 measures 4,350mm long, 1,785mm wide and 2,535mm tall with a wheelbase that spans 2,535mm. Powering the vehicle is an electric motor that generates up to 163hp and a Ni-Co lithium manganate battery pack. Based on the previous naming convention, the “535” indicates that the new BEV’s range at constant speed will be 535km.Source: Gasgoo BYD New Energy Vehicle Sales Exceeded 240,000 In 2018 China Electric Car Sales Soar To Almost 160,000 In December Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 18, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

Worlds energy transition in doubt as progress stalls World Economic Forum says

first_imgSource: Charge Forward A global transition to affordable and sustainable energy “has stagnated, with little or no progress achieved in the past five years,” according to a new report from the World Economic Forum. more…The post World’s energy transition ‘in doubt’ as progress stalls, World Economic Forum says appeared first on Electrek.last_img

Hyundai upgrades IONIQ Electric with significantly bigger battery and design refresh

first_imgHyundai is three years into its IONIQ program, which includes 3 versions (hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and all-electric), and today, it unveiled a refresh version with the all-electric version getting a bigger battery pack for a significantly longer range. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8COKnXNH-EThe post Hyundai upgrades IONIQ Electric with significantly bigger battery and design refresh appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img read more

Friday Roundup

first_imgFrom Representative Jackie Speier (D-CA) recently on MSNBC’s Hardball. “if you do business in any country where you believe that there is money that`s being used that is being laundered, you`re subject to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.”SillyLast week I was interviewed by one of the journalists who wrote this article in the Wall Street Journal finding that “Wall Street regulators have imposed far lower penalties in the first six months of Donald Trump’s presidency than they did during the first six months of 2016, a comparable period in the Obama administration.”I said that the analysis was silly in that it compared the first six months of an established administration to the first six months of a new administration. Furthermore, it is silly to make any conclusions based on six months worth of data. Moreover, of the $750 million cited in the article from the first six months of 2016, $162.5 million (22%) was from just one enforcement action (Vimpelcom).$50 Million Spent in Approximately 9 MonthsThis 2016 post highlighted Cognizant Technology Solutions Corp.’s FCPA scrutiny first disclosed in late September 2016.This February 2017 post asked “is it possible to spend $20 million in one quarter conducting an FCPA investigation?” Apparently so because highlighted in the prior post Cognizant incurred approximately $20 million in Q4 2016 due to the ongoing investigation.When Cognizant thereafter disclosed “in 2016, we incurred $27 million in costs related to the FCPA investigation and related lawsuits” this post asked is Cognizant “boiling the ocean?” During my nearly decade-long FCPA private practice career, I conducted several FCPA internal investigations around the world. Such investigations are not a cost-free exercise.However, Cognizant’s disclosure that it has incurred approximately $50 million in approximately 9 months strikes me as highly unusual and if I were a Cognizant board member (not to mention a Cognizant shareholder), I would have some serious concerns.For the Reading StackThis article really has nothing to do with ethics and compliance, but it goes to show that what is generally perceived to be best practices at the time don’t necessarily turn out to be actual best practices. Issue to ponder, scrutiny alert, laughable, silly, $50 million spent in approximately 9 months, and for the reading stack. It’s all here in the Friday roundup.Issue to PonderIf the FCPA and U.K. Bribery Act “have been broadly effective in addressing and remediating corrupt practices within … companies [subject to the laws]” as asserted in this article, then why – generally speaking – is there more (not less) enforcement actions under these laws over time? Scrutiny AlertStericycle, Inc. (an Illinois-based waste management company) recently disclosed:“On June 12, 2017, the SEC issued a subpoena to the Company, requesting documents and information relating to the Company’s compliance with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”) or other foreign or domestic anti-corruption laws with respect to certain of the Company’s operations in Latin America. In addition, the Department of Justice has notified the Company that it is investigating this matter in parallel with the SEC. The Company is cooperating with these agencies. The Company is also conducting an internal investigation of these matters, under the oversight of the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors and with the assistance of outside counsel, and this investigation has found evidence of improper conduct. We have not accrued any amounts in respect of this matter, as we cannot estimate any reasonably possible loss or any range of reasonably possible losses that we may incur. We are unable to make such an estimate because, based on what we know now, in our judgment, the factual and legal issues presented in this matter are sufficiently unique that we are unable to identify other circumstances sufficiently comparable to provide guidance in making estimates.”LaughableSome laughable FCPA commentary to share in the hopes that people will be more disciplined and diligent when writing about the FCPA.*****This FCPA Compliance and Ethics Report post states that under the FCPA “internal controls must be effective.”False. The statutory standard is that issuers shall “devise and maintain a system of internal accounting controls sufficient to provide reasonable assurances” relevant to the four financial objectives set forth in the statute.*****A laughable statement from Mother Jones.“Under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), American companies that operate abroad must screen any potential business partners for hints of corruption or ethical shadiness.”Where to even begin with this statement?***** Learn More & Registercenter_img FCPA Institute – Boston (Oct. 3-4) A unique two-day learning experience ideal for a diverse group of professionals seeking to elevate their FCPA knowledge and practical skills through active learning. Learn more, spend less. CLE credit is available. As highlighted in this prior post, for first quarter of 2017 Cognizant disclosed that it “incurred $14 million in costs related to the FCPA investigation and related lawsuits.”Recently, Cognizant disclosed:“We are conducting an internal investigation focused on whether certain payments relating to Company-owned facilities in India were made improperly and in possible violation of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or FCPA, and other applicable laws. In September 2016, we voluntarily notified the U.S. Department of Justice, or DOJ, and Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, and are cooperating fully with both agencies. The investigation is being conducted under the oversight of the Audit Committee, with the assistance of outside counsel. To date, the investigation has identified a total of approximately $6 million in payments made between 2010 and 2015 that may have been improper. During the year ended December 31, 2016, we recorded out-of-period corrections related to $4 million of such payments that had been previously capitalized that should have been expensed. These out-of-period corrections and the other $2 million in potentially improper payments were not material to any previously issued financial statements. The investigation is also examining various other payments made in small amounts in India and elsewhere that may not have complied with Company policy or applicable law. There were no adjustments recorded during the six months ended June 30, 2017.[…]During the quarter ended June 30, 2017, we incurred $8 million in costs related to the FCPA investigation and related lawsuits. We expect to continue to incur expenses related to these matters for the remainder of 2017 and future periods, including with respect to remediating the material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting.[…]We have undertaken a number of measures designed to directly address, or that may contribute to, the remediation of our material weakness or the enhancement of our internal controls over financial reporting. While the internal investigation is ongoing, based on the results of the investigation to date, the members of senior management who may have participated in or been aware of the making of the identified potentially improper payments and failed to take action to prevent the making of the identified potentially improper payments are no longer with the Company or in a senior management position. Additional personnel actions have been taken with respect to other employees and further actions may be required.Further, among other things, we have made certain new management appointments, including a new President and a new General Counsel, added resources and personnel to our compliance function and programs, enhanced our oversight controls in the areas of procurement and accounts payable as they relate to real estate transactions in India, and enhanced our compliance program and control environment through a number of actions, including additional and improved anti-corruption and ethical conduct training programs and a distribution of a revised code of ethics to all employees.Changes to internal controls over financial reporting need to operate for a period of time in order for management to evaluate and test whether the internal control changes are effective. We have commenced our evaluation of the effectiveness of certain changes to our internal controls over financial reporting implemented to directly address the material weakness.”Add it up and Cognizant has spent approximately $50 million in approximately 9 months in connection with its FCPA scrutiny and related civil lawsuits.last_img

2019 Season Countdown 68 Quinten Johnson

first_imgJohnson committed to Michigan last July and stuck with the Wolverines throughout, despite not publicly signing his National Letter of Intent until January. There has been some scuttlebutt about his playing Viper at the next level, but he’s a safety prospect as well. With the way Michigan has deployed defensive backs over the past few seasons, I imagine he will start off at safety with some long-term potential to play Viper, depending on how his body develops. Quinten Johnson (image via Rivals)  1 0You need to login in order to vote Prediction: Redshirt Name: Quinten JohnsonHeight: 5’10”Weight: 193 lbs.High school: Washington (DC) St. John’sPosition: SafetyClass: FreshmanJersey number: N/ALast year: Johnson was a senior in high school (LINK). He made 35 tackles, 10 tackles for loss, 1 sack, 2 interceptions, 1 fumble recovery returned for a TD, and 3 forced fumbles.TTB Rating: 79 This season the Viper spot is in good hands with Khaleke Hudson, Jordan Glasgow, Michael Barrett, and potentially freshman 5-star recruit Daxton Hill. With Hudson and Glasgow departing after 2019, there’s also some buzz that safeties Brad Hawkins and/or J’Marick Woods could move to Viper for 2020. I think Johnson would be best served by redshirting, but safeties are a weird deal; they can play special teams and potentially play a lot of roles in sub packages. If Michigan stays healthy in the secondary, I think Johnson will redshirt, but he has enough athleticism to get some time against the right team or if somebody gets nicked. Tags: 2019 season countdown, Quinten Johnsonlast_img read more

Researchers identify brain networks involved in object naming

first_imgAug 15 2018Scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have identified the brain networks that allow you to think of an object name and then verbalize that thought. The study appeared in the July issue of BRAIN. It represents a significant advance in the understanding of how the brain connects meaning to words and will help the planning of brain surgeries.Their discovery could help explain why people with neurodegenerative disease often forget the names of objects. An estimated 5.7 million Americans of all ages have Alzheimer’s dementia. Described as the tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon in healthy individuals, the inability to recall the name of items is a condition called anomia.”Object naming has been a core method of study of anomia, but the processes that occur when we come up with these names, generally in less than a second, are not well understood. We mapped the brain regions responsible for naming objects with millimeter precision and studied their behavior at the millisecond scale,” said Nitin Tandon, M.D., the study’s senior author and a professor in the Vivian L. Smith Department of Neurosurgery at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth.Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injury”The role of the basal temporal lobe in semantic processes has been underappreciated. Surgeons could use this information to design better approaches for epilepsy and tumor surgery, and to reduce the cognitive side effects of these surgical procedures,” said Tandon, who is also the director of the epilepsy program with the Memorial Hermann Mischer Neuroscience Institute-Texas Medical Center and a member of the faculty at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center UTHealth Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.Tandon added that this study is of particular value as it produced convergent maps with three powerful techniques: electrophysiology, imaging and brain stimulation.While their brain activity was being monitored for epileptic seizures, 71 patients were asked to look at a picture of an object and identify it and/or asked to listen to a verbal description of an object and name it. Much like explorers mapped the wilderness, the researchers used these brain data to map out the brain networks responsible for certain processes.With the aid of both electrocorticography and functional magnetic resonance imaging, researchers zeroed in on the specific brain regions and networks involved in the naming process. This was then confirmed with a pre-surgical mapping technique called direct cortical stimulation that temporarily shuts down small regions of the brain.”The power of this study lies in the large number of patients who performed name production via two different routes and were studied by three distinct modalities,” said Kiefer Forseth, the study’s lead author and an M.D./Ph.D. student at MD Anderson UTHealth Graduate School.​Source: https://www.uth.edu/media/story.htm?id=c091fcea-5df7-4a53-a61d-21ca416aaa2clast_img read more

NSFs Science Board Criticizes Bill to Alter Agencys Programs

Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The presidentially appointed oversight body to the National Science Foundation (NSF) has taken the unprecedented step of publicly criticizing pending legislation that it feels would be harmful to the $7 billion research agency.The stance taken by the National Science Board (NSB), detailed in a 5-paragraph statement released today, escalates a yearlong battle between the scientific community and Representative Lamar Smith (R-TX), the chair of the science committee in the U.S. House of Representatives. Smith’s bill (H.R. 4186) to reauthorize NSF programs “impose[s] significant new burdens on scientists that would not be offset by gains to the nation,” the board declares. “We are concerned that the proposed new legislative requirements might discourage visionary proposals or transformative science at a time when advancing the decades-long U.S. leadership in science and technology is a top priority.”Those requirements include telling NSF how to vet grant proposals under its so-called merit review process. Smith has repeatedly highlighted specific grants that he feels are frivolous or wasteful and has said the legislation, called the Frontiers in Innovation, Research, Science, and Technology (FIRST) Act, is designed to make NSF more accountable and to make its grantsmaking process more transparent. National Science Board Science board members could not recall another instance in which the board spoke out on pending legislation, although in 1998 it was asked by Congress to comment on an NSF reauthorization bill. But “we feel that the health and prosperity of the U.S. scientific enterprise is part of our responsibility, and this is a statement of our belief,” explains Dan Arvizu, the board’s chair and director of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado.In particular, NSB members feel that the bill’s language “is just too constraining,” says Kelvin Droegemeier, the board’s vice chair and vice president for research at the University of Oklahoma. “There are lots of things that could be problematic for peer review and that could slow things down,” he tells ScienceInsider. The statement notes that NSF and the board “are implementing new processes that will increase both transparency and accountability. We therefore do not see a need to impose new, more inflexible, legislated requirements on NSF and our science and engineering communities.”Smith responded to a request from ScienceInsider with an e-mail that questions the sincerity of NSF’s attempts to address his concerns. “After a year of the National Science Foundation (NSF) resisting calls for more public accountability, the agency’s last-minute announcement of a new internal policy is too little too late,” Smith writes. “The internal policy would continue to allow the NSF to evade responsibility for their decisions to fund questionable grants. The NSF wants to be the only federal agency to get a blank check signed by taxpayers, without having to justify how the money is spent.”FIRST is an authorization bill, meaning it only recommends spending levels. (Congress follows a parallel process, using its appropriations committees, to determine actual yearly budgets for every agency.) And the science board objects to the fact that the bill suggests specific funding levels for each of NSF’s research directorates.That level of detail is new for NSF reauthorization bills, which have previously proposed an overall amount for spending on research. The differentiation is seen as a way for the science committee to cut funding for the social and behavioral sciences, disciplines that many committee Republicans have said are less important to the nation than research in the physical sciences and engineering.“[T]he bill’s specification of budget allocations to each NSF directorate would significantly impede NSF’s flexibility to deploy its funds to support the best ideas,” according to the board’s statement. Droegemeier fleshed out the board’s concern by noting that “the scientific community really determines our priorities by presenting us with the most exciting research opportunities, and anything that reduces that flexibility would not be wise.”Smith disagrees, arguing that Congress has a responsibility to make sure that tax dollars are spent most effectively. “The NSF’s new internal policy omits any commitment to make awards that are in the ‘national interest,’ a standard that should guide taxpayer-funded grants,” he writes. “Under the Obama administration there has been a shift in priorities from engineering and the physical sciences to more taxpayer-funded social, behavioral and economic (SBE) research. Basic research in the physical sciences drives economic growth, produces new technologies and creates jobs. The Committee’s support for NSF’s important work is reflected in the fact that the FIRST Act authorizes more funding than the President’s budget request.  But to regain America’s scientific edge the Committee will adjust priorities for taxpayer-supported research.”The FIRST bill was approved by the science committee’s research panel on 13 March and is expected to be adopted by the full committee sometime in May. Droegemeier said the board wanted to express its views before the committee met. At the same time, the bill will need to be passed by the House and the Senate—which has yet to draft its own version of an NSF reauthorization bill—before it becomes law.Although the NSF board and Smith are at loggerheads on this issue, they are not strangers; Smith attended a private session of the board last year and has talked with some of its officers. And although the science committee doesn’t set NSF’s budget, Droegemeier was careful to show deference to a legislator with considerable clout over NSF’s activities.“We appreciate his passion for science,” Droegemeier says. “He absolutely gets it. And we value our communication with him.” But Droegemeier said that “it’s hard to get into the head of an individual legislator. There are a lot of things about the legislative process we don’t understand.” read more

How modern humans ate their way to world dominance

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Two million years ago, our early ancestors such as Australopithecus or early members of Homo likely found wild yams and other tubers bitter. But as humans began to cook, they could roast tuberous root vegetables long enough that they weren’t as bitter. (Today, hunter-gatherers still rely on roasted tubers as a major source of calories.) At the same time, hominins—members of the human family—lost those two particular bitter taste genes, so they were presumably able to eat a wider range of tuberous plants. Modern humans, Neandertals, and Denisovans all lost the ability to detect the bitter flavor in some wild plants and eventually modern humans bred varieties of squashes, gourds, and yams that are less bitter than the wild types.The team also found some intriguing differences between modern humans, who arose in Africa in the past 200,000 years or so, and our archaic human relatives, such as Neandertals and Denisovans. Our lineage, for example, carries an average of six copies, and as many as 20 copies, of the salivary amylase gene, AMY1. The gene produces the enzyme amylase in our saliva, which has been thought to help digest sugars in starchy foods, although its role in human digestion is still unproven. By contrast, chimps, Neandertals, and Denisovans carry only one to two copies of the salivary amylase gene, which suggests they got fewer calories from starchy veggies than modern humans. This confirms an earlier finding that Neandertals didn’t have extra copies of the amylase gene and is “definitely a surprise,” says biological anthropologist Richard Wrangham of Harvard University, who was not a co-author on this paper.Wrangham has proposed that a key human ancestor, H. erectus, relied on cooking starchy tuberous roots to get enough calories to expand its brain. But if so, that distant ancestor wasn’t using extra copies of the amylase gene to extract more calories from these plant foods. He and Harvard postdoctoral researcher Rachel Carmody suggest the amylase copies may have had other functions, such as helping prevent cavities.And although researchers have proposed earlier that this adaptation took place with the invention of agriculture, Perry and his colleagues have found that hunter-gatherers also carry the extra copies of the salivary amylase gene. This suggests that this adaptation took place in modern humans, after the split with the ancestor they shared with Neandertals about 600,000 years ago but before plants were domesticated 10,000 years ago. “This doesn’t mean that earlier hominins weren’t eating more starch, but perhaps they weren’t getting all of the same benefits as modern humans,” Perry says.One sign that cooking shaped our ancestors’ genomes as well as our guts is that humans, Neandertals, and Denisovans all have lost a masticatory myosin gene, MYH16, that helps build strong chewing muscles in the jaws of chimps. This may be one result of learning to cook, which softens food, Perry says. This fits with evidence that some early hominins were chefs—Neandertals in the Middle East cooked barley porridge, for example.Now, Perry and his colleagues are trying to figure out when this gene was lost in the human lineage. The loss of the gene for muscular jaws in Neandertals, Denisovans, and moderns suggests that cooking arose in their common ancestor, H. erectus, he says.center_img The difference between humans and their closest relatives is partly a matter of taste. Yams, pumpkins, and squash are as bland as potatoes to our tongues today, but to a chimp and our ancestors, wild varieties were bitter and yucky. Now scientists have pinpointed some of the genetic changes that allowed our ancestors to diversify their palates, potentially allowing them to take better advantage of a wide range of foods—and conquer the world.As humans adapted to new habitats, they had to become open to new culinary experiences. They ate more starchy tuberous roots, learned to cook their meat and bitter root vegetables, and eventually domesticated plants and animals. Those dietary revolutions helped make us human, giving our bodies the extra calories that enlarged our brains, while allowing our guts, jaws, and teeth to shrink as we ate softer, more easily digestible food.To figure out how these changes evolved, anthropological geneticist George Perry of Pennsylvania State University, University Park, and his colleagues compared the genomes of modern humans and chimpanzees to the newly published genomes of a Neandertal and one of its close relatives, a mysterious human ancestor known as a Denisovan, known only from a few bones found in a Russian cave. All three groups of humans had lost two bitter taste genes, TAS2R62 and TAS2R64, that are still present in chimpanzees, the team reports this month in the Journal of Human Evolution. Emaillast_img read more

Monarchs in Mexico recovering from record low numbers

first_imgThe number of monarch butterflies wintering in Mexico is up for the second year in a row but their famous migration remains imperiled, researchers said in a press conference in Mexico City today. Every year, millions of butterflies journey from their breeding grounds in the U.S. Midwest and Canada to their winter habitat in the oyamel fir and pine forests of central Mexico. Beginning in 1993, researchers have ventured into those forests and measured the total area covered by the butterflies, the established proxy for their numbers. According to the most recent survey, conducted in December 2015 and released today, monarchs covered 4 hectares of forest this winter. That’s nearly four times more area than the 1.13 hectares the butterflies occupied last year, indicating that the population continues to rebound from the all-time recorded low of 0.67 hectares in the winter of 2013–14. But monarch numbers remain low compared with the late 1990s and early 2000s, when the butterflies often covered 8 hectares or more. The main threat to the butterflies’ 4000-kilometer journey continues to be the loss of milkweed in the United States, says Omar Vidal, the director general of the World Wildlife Fund Mexico, which administers the annual count. Monarchs lay their eggs exclusively on milkweed, which used to thrive in between rows of crops in farmers’ fields. But since farmers have adopted herbicide-resistant corn and soybeans, they have been able to spray their fields with powerful chemicals that have all but wiped out milkweed where the monarchs need it most.last_img read more

Landmark analysis documents the alarming global decline of nature

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Black rhinos, poached for their horns, are just one of some 1 million species that a new report warns are at risk of extinction. Email By Erik StokstadMay. 6, 2019 , 5:55 AM The state of biodiversity and ecosystems is at its most perilous point in human history and the decline is accelerating, warns a landmark assessment released today. But the hope is that the bleak assessment—crafted by hundreds of scientists and historic in its depth and breadth—will finally persuade governments and others of the need to change course and prevent further harm to the ecological systems that provide for human well-being. “What’s at stake here is a livable world,” says Robert Watson of the University of East Anglia in Norwich, U.K., who chaired the organization that produced the report.Only transformative changes to economic, political, and social systems will allow nations to meet agreed targets for nature conservation, the authors conclude. The core message is “quite radical,” says Georgina Mace, an ecologist at University College London who reviewed the assessment. “You have to prioritize nature and nature’s benefits to people in everything you do.”The report confirms “that we can’t just preserve, we must reverse the trend by increasing biodiversity locally, regionally, and globally,” said Alexandre Antonelli, director of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew in the United Kingdom, in a statement. Mint Images/Aurora Photos Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Seventy-five percent of land has been “severely altered” by human activities. More than a third of land and almost 75% of freshwater is used for crops or livestock. The extent of living coral reef has dropped by perhaps half since the 1870s. One hundred million hectares of tropical forest have been destroyed between 1980 and 2000. Wetlands, which provide clean water and fish, are being destroyed three times faster than forests. Plastic pollution has increased 10-fold since 1980 and 300 million to 400 million tons of industrial waste are dumped each year. Coasts are marred by some 400 low-oxygen dead zones, equivalent to the area of the United Kingdom. The report comes from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), based in Bonn, Germany, which includes representatives from more than 100 countries. More than 450 experts from around the world were involved in drafting the 1800-page report over 3 years. They reviewed some 15,000 scientific papers and other sources of data on trends in biodiversity and its ability to provide what are known as ecosystem services or nature’s contributions to people: everything from food and fiber to clean water and air.Many species are declining, the report notes. Out of 8 million known species of animals and plants, about 1 million are under threat of extinction, including more than 40% of amphibian species and a third of marine mammals. Even more are declining in numbers: Since 1900, native species have become, on average, about 20% less abundant. Measures of the extent and condition of natural ecosystems have declined 47% since the earliest estimates and many are deteriorating by 4% every decade.The report highlights other metrics of the decline of nature and its human domination. They include: Landmark analysis documents the alarming global decline of nature Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country “The message is unfortunately very alarming,” says Hesiquio Benitez of the National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity in Mexico City, a national delegate who voted to approve the report. “We’re reaching the limits of the planet.”For the first time at a global scale, the report has ranked the causes of damage. Topping the list, changes in land use—principally agriculture—that have destroyed habitat. Second, hunting and other kinds of exploitation. These are followed by climate change, pollution, and invasive species, which are being spread by trade and other activities. Climate change will likely overtake the other threats in the next decades, the authors note. Driving these threats are the growing human population, which has doubled since 1970 to 7.6 billion, and consumption. (Per capita of use of materials is up 15% over the past 5 decades.) The report also includes perspectives from indigenous and local communities to a greater extent than before. Lands managed by indigenous peoples are declining less quickly than elsewhere, but 72% of indicators developed by such communities show deterioration of nature.There are a few bright spots, mostly the increasing creation of nature reserves and marine protected areas. But the progress is not nearly enough to meet most of the international conservation targets that nations set in the Convention on Biological Diversity in 2010. The declining state of nature also jeopardizes efforts to meet many of the United Nations’s Sustainable Development Goals, such as ending hunger. “If we continue with business as usual, we’ll miss [the goals],” Mace says. “We’re quite good at making plans, and quite good at setting aside protected areas, but the response of the natural world is nothing like good enough to meet the targets.”The new report is the first global analysis of the state of nature since 2005, when researchers assembled what is known as the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. But the hope is that the IPBES report will have a greater impact than that study. The new report “is significant, because it’s the first global assessment that has been asked for by governments—they’ve been involved in it, they’ve shaped it,” says Peter Bridgewater, a biodiversity policy expert and adjunct at the University of Canberra, who was not involved in the report. Delegates from member nations approved the report on Saturday, after a week negotiating the text of the 40-page summary for policymakers.According to scenarios included in the report that examine the consequences of various possible policy decisions to 2050, the news will keep getting worse unless transformative change occurs. That change would involve undertaking a wide array of activities, the authors write, including land restoration, more widespread adoption of agroecological practices such as preventing soil erosion, and more widely enforced limits on fishing. Fundamentally, reversing the trends will require a shift to a more sustainable global economy, the authors state, and “steering away from the current limited paradigm of economic growth.”In its call for transformation, the report anticipates pushback: “By its very nature, transformative change can expect opposition from those with interests vested in the status quo, but such opposition can be overcome for the broader public good.” IPBES will examine how to achieve such transformative change as part of its next round of work, notes Esther Turnhout, a science policy expert at Wageningen University in the Netherlands. The goal, she says, would be to better understand “how we can tackle those challenges and why we haven’t done so.”Anne Larigauderie, executive secretary of IPBES, is optimistic the global report released today will make a difference. “The moment for biodiversity has arrived,” she says, pointing to growing initiatives and interest in protecting nature. “There is so much evidence, and the scientific community is speaking with one voice,” Larigauderie says. “Now it’s not something that can be ignored.”last_img read more

Humans held responsible for twists and turns of climate change since 1900

first_img Universal History Archive/UIG/Getty Images Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The AMO arose from observations that sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic seem to swing from unusually warm to cold and back over some 20 to 60 years; the ancient climate appears to have had similar swings. Researchers theorized that periodic shifts in the conveyor belt of Atlantic Ocean currents drive this variability. But why the conveyor would regularly speed and slow on its own was a mystery, and the evidence for grand regular oscillations has slowly been eroding, says Gabriele Hegerl, a statistical climatologist at the University of Edinburgh. “Those are harder to defend.”The new skepticism kicked off with work led by Ben Booth, a climate scientist at the Met Office Hadley Centre in Exeter, U.K.. In 2012, he reported in Nature that pollution hazes, or aerosols, began thickening the clouds over the Atlantic in the 1950s, which could have cooled the ocean with little help from an internal oscillation. In the past year, several independent models have yielded similar results. Meanwhile, most global climate models have been unable to reproduce AMO-like oscillations unless researchers include the influence of pollutants, such as soot and sulfates produced by burning fossil fuels, says Amy Clement, a climate scientist at the University of Miami in Florida.Now, it seems plausible that such human influences, with help from aerosols spewed by volcanic eruptions, drove virtually all 20th century climate change. Haustein and his co-authors tweaked a relatively simple climate model to account for the fact that most pollution originates over land, which heats and cools faster than the ocean—and there’s much more land in the Northern Hemisphere. And they dialed back the cooling effect of volcanic eruptions—a reasonable move, says Booth, who is not affiliated with the study. “We’ve known models respond too strongly to volcanoes.”The also adjusted the global temperature record to account for a change in how ocean temperatures are measured; during World War II, the British practice of measuring water samples in buckets gave way to systematically warmer U.S. readings of water passing through ships’ intake valves. Past efforts to compensate for that change fell short, Haustein and his team found, so they used data from weather stations on coastlines and islands to correct the record.As input for the model, the team used greenhouse gas and aerosol records developed for the next U.N. climate report, along with records of historical volcanic eruptions, solar cycles, and El Niño warmings of the Pacific. Comparing the simulated climate with the adjusted temperature record, they found that internal variability could explain only 7% of the record. Instead, soot from industry drove early 20th century warming as it drifted into the Arctic, darkening snow and absorbing sunlight. After World War II, light-reflecting sulfate haze from power plants increased, holding off potential warming from rising greenhouse gases. Then, pollution control arrived during the 1970s, allowing warming to speed ahead.It’s a compelling portrait, but it could have been substantially different if the team had used other, equally justifiable assumptions about the climate impact of aerosols, Booth says. Trenberth thinks the team’s adjustments had the effect of fitting the model to an uncertain record. “There is considerable wiggle room in just what the actual record is,” he says.Haustein disputes that the team tailored the model to explain the 20th century warming. “All we did was use available data in the most physically consistent way,” he says. The researchers ran the model from 1500 to 2015, and he says it matches paleoclimate records well, including Europe’s Little Ice Age.If a grand ocean oscillation isn’t shaping climate, a future ocean cooling is unlikely to buy society time to address global warming. But the demise of the AMO also might make it easier to predict what is in store. “All we’re going to get in the future,” Haustein says, “is what we do.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Soot from industry in Europe and the United States drove Arctic warming a century ago. By Paul VoosenMay. 23, 2019 , 12:15 PMcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email While industry and agriculture belched greenhouse gases at an increasing pace through the 20th century, global temperature followed a jagged course, surging for 3 decades starting in 1915, leveling off from the 1950s to the late 1970s, and then resuming its climb. For decades, scientists have chalked up these early swings to the planet’s internal variability—in particular, a climatic pacemaker called the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO), which is characterized by long-term shifts in ocean temperatures. But researchers are increasingly questioning whether the AMO played the dominant role once thought. The oceanic pacemaker seems to be fluttering.It is now possible to explain the record’s twists and turns almost entirely without the AMO, says Karsten Haustein, a climate scientist at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom and lead author of a new study published this month in the Journal of Climate. After correcting for the distinct effects of pollution hazes over land and ocean and for flaws in the temperature record, Haustein and his colleagues calculated that the interplay of greenhouse gases and atmospheric pollution almost singlehandedly shaped 20th century climate. “It’s very unlikely there’s this ocean leprechaun that produces cyclicity that we don’t know about,” Haustein says—which means it is also unlikely that a future cool swing in the AMO will blunt the ongoing human-driven warming.Others aren’t convinced the “leprechaun” is entirely vanquished. “They are probably right in that [the AMO] is not as big a player globally as has sometimes been thought,” says Kevin Trenberth, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. “But my guess is that they underestimate its role a bit.” Humans held responsible for twists and turns of climate change since 1900last_img read more

The Grisly End of a Popular Prime Minister at the Hands of

first_imgWhen 28-year-old Johan de Witt was first voted as the Dutch councilor pensionary in 1653, a position equivalent to being a prime minister at the time, his future looked bright. In fact, the man was thrice re-elected to the post, in 1658, 1663, and 1668 respectively. De Witt led his people during the “Dutch golden age” when the country retained a status of being one of Europe’s greatest powers, and when wealth was pouring into Dutch harbors via lucrative trade routes worked by the Dutch East India Company in Asia.As disastrous wars followed with England and France, the Netherlands went through its “annus horribilis” or the so-called Dutch rampjaar, in 1672. Someone had to pay the price for that and the fingers of blame were pointed to Johan de Witt and his sibling Cornelis de Witt who also held a position of power. Their end might easily remind you of a bleak episode of Black Mirror.Old VOC sailing ship Halve Maen at the river Ijssel during the 2018 Sail Kampen event in the Hanseatic league city of Kampen in Overijssel, The Netherlands.Johan de Witt, born 1625, came from a prominent family who already had substantial political influence in the Netherlands. De Witt’s father served as a mayor in the family’s home city, Dordrecht, which is also the oldest city in the country.A notable family name combined with good education seemed a perfect formula for Johan de Witt to position himself as a leader. Having exceptional math skills he took over the country’s financial sector after coming to power. And with great diplomacy, Johan de Witt also calmed down the ongoing First Anglo-Dutch War (1652-1654) only a year into his first term.Johan de WittBut as the annals of Dutch history tell us, there were two major opposing sides in the Dutch Republic at the time: the Republican merchant class as opposed to the Orange monarchists (the aristocratic dynasty also known as the House of Nassau). De Witt himself came from a family which was largely against the House of Orange, and he would work against them coming to power.Nevertheless, tides in politics do change as quickly as the tides of the seas. Tensions would persist with the neighbors across the sea–the English, as the Dutch appeared to be their major maritime competitors. An inevitable escalation of this tension resulted with a second consecutive war in 1665, though at this point Johan de Witt defended its territories.Rotterdam, Schiekade. Statue of Johan de Wit.But seven years later, in 1672, things turned catastrophic. A third consecutive war broke out with England, coupled with a dreadful declaration of war that came from France’s Louis XIV, along with their allies Münster and Cologne. The Dutch now had to sustain attacks coming from all sides and chaos and panic escalated as French troops were quick to progress to the heart of the country.This all came at the loss of Johan de Witt and his political approval. And while his bitter and brutal end was nearing, there came William III from the House of Orange, a sovereign Prince of Orange since birth, and his popularity grew ever more rapidly.Statue of Johan and Cornelis de Witt in the Dutch town Dordrecht. Photo by Ad Meskens -CC BY-SA 4.0Johan De Witt along with his brother Cornelis, largely denounced, both went on to resign from their duties in the summer of 1672. Toxic rumors then spread that Cornelis had betrayed the Dutch and even that he plotted killing the Prince of Orange. Subsequently, he was imprisoned for treason.Engraving From 1837 Featuring The Dutch Politician, Johan De Witt. De Witt Lived From 1625 Until 1672.According to Frans Grijzenhout who tackles this episode of Dutch history in the Journal of Historians of Netherlandish Art, there were portraits and paintings of both de Witt that were being removed from public buildings and defaced, an act that can be interpreted as their “ritual killing” by opponents.As such symbolic assassinations of the brothers were conducted throughout that entire summer, a real assassination now seemed only a step away.A painting depicting the phases of the murder of the De Witts.On August 20, 1672, Johan de Witt went to see his jailed brother Cornelis at the Hague. A mob of people in the mood to lynch the two of them learned about this meeting and proceeded to pursue a gruesome undertaking. The angry mob gathered outside the prison, from where both Johan and Cornelis were dragged without mercy to the gallows. Their bodies were brutally mutilated then hanged.Some accounts suggest that there were people in the mob who took body parts from the dismembered men and some that even ate whatever they grabbed. One person is said to have even feasted on an eyeball.Johan de WittPerhaps some parts of the story how the de Witts met with their death are slightly exaggerated, however, their end was disgusting and should be no surprise if the mob really indulged themselves in the debauchery of the corpses. This used to be a normal occurrence at the gallows.Queen Wilhelmina unveiling a statue of Johan de Witt on the Plaats in The Hague on 12 June 1918.The abhorrent demise of the brothers has been reproduced in Dutch paintings times and times over. Perhaps the most popular one is a small canvas depicting their two mutilated bodies hanging, the artwork being attributed to Dutch portrait painter Jan de Baen. It can be seen in Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum.The Historical Museum in the Hague also accommodates some remains of the bodies of Johan and Cornelis, such as a tongue and finger bone. The relics are kept in a small glass coffin.Read another story from us: Stranger than fiction – Wacky facts From HistoryAcross the Netherlands today, the figure of Johan de Witt is further remembered with several statues erected during the 20th century. After all, de Witt was once considered a great leader, and despite receiving such a brutal death blow at the end, his figure is well remembered in Dutch society.last_img read more

The Fastest Car on Earth Produced a Shattering Sonic Boom

first_imgThe fastest car on Earth looks like something from a sci-fi movie. Car aficionados certainly thrive on the feeling of hitting high speeds on the open highway. Speed is something celebrated in society. Grand Prix racing on closed roads and other tracks that make racing possible, reached tremendous popularity during the course of the previous century. For instance, in 1950, Formula One kicked off with its first, inaugural season. But reaching a speed of 763 mph (more than 1,200 km/h) is a challenge even for the most adrenaline-seeking of drivers, and it’s certainly not something for the faint-hearted. Hitting such speed has nothing to do with any Grand Prix racing either.The team with ThrustSSC. Photo by ArpingstoneIt was October 15, 1997 when UK Royal Air Force pilot Andy Green maneuvered Thrust SSC in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. That day, Green set a world land-speed record that still remains untouched over two decades later.As the Guinness World Record website notes, the Thrust SSC reached an astonishing 763.035 mph (1,227.985 km/h) that day, and the “land-speed record, aka the fastest car on Earth, remains one of the benchmarks of technological development.”ThrustSSC, British built ground speed record holder. Photo by Boris Lux, Hamburg – Germany Mycdes CC BY 3.0Thrust SSC, which looks more like a plane than a car, not only broke land-speed records to become the fastest car on Earth but it was the first car in the world to break the sound barrier too. The sonic boom was so powerful it caused buildings to shake in the nearby town of Gerlach, roughly 12 miles from where the history of speed was being written, reports Guinness World Records.Related Video:Thrust SSC represents a peak in engineering achievement. While the speed of sound had been previously broken by a number of aircraft, the phenomenon had not been witnessed on the ground. With a top speed of over 1,200 km/h, things could easily go south, of course. Objects close to a vehicle moving at such speed could easily cause disruption or explosion.Rear wheel assembly of the Thrust SSC. Photo by Ben Sutherland CC BY 2.0The temperatures at the vehicle’s rear reportedly hit more than 570 degrees Fahrenheit and sound levels approached 175 dB. Thrust SSC relied on a pair of Rolls-Royce Spey 205 turbojet engines, which according to Interesting Engineering, “produce 100,000hp between them — the same output as three naval frigates.”The Thrust SSC at Coventry Motor Museum. Photo by Ben Sutherland  CC BY 2.0With great machines also come some great responsibilities. The makers of Thrust SSC had to ensure the model would hold together at such potentially devastating speeds, and that the pilot would also survive the ordeal (yes, pilot is the better choice of word than driver in this case).Super wheels, capable of rotating at 8,500 rpm were integrated into the design. 8,500 rpm is much more than a normal car tire can sustain, therefore the wheels had to undergo a substantial redesign.ThrustSSC right-engine, Coventry Transport Museum. Photo by Morio CC BY 3.0“The radial acceleration at the rim is 35,000G — speeds which would disintegrate any traditional tire. Instead, to cope with the enormous centripetal forces, L27 aluminum wheels were cast. Each one weighted in excess of 160 kg,” explains Intersting Engineering.The overall Thrust SSC design allowed the pilot only partial control of the vehicle. Hence, traditional safety systems had to be abandoned in favor of mechanisms and safety sensors to keep the vehicle on ground and in a safe, straight trajectory.ThrustSSC pitot tube, Coventry Transport Museum. Photo by Morio CC BY 3.0A plethora of sensors allowed various data such as speed, direction, and thrust to be observed in the course of action. In case an engine went off, the Thrust SSC could shut down its other engine in milliseconds thanks to some of them. In case the vehicle went off the ground, another command would order an additional three tonnes of downforce again in the matter of milliseconds.Read another story from us: The Pink Car for Women in the 1950sTwo decades after setting a world speed record, Thrust SSC along with another Thrust model sits in retirement at the Coventry Transport Museum. Visitors can revere it as a testimony to fascinating human achievement and the longing to move faster than was ever thought possible.last_img read more

Mumbai Day after walls collapsed in Malad toll climbs to 26

first_img Post Comment(s) Four more bodies were recovered from under the debris on Wednesday. Among them was three-year-old Akanksha Kurade, who was found wrapped in a bedsheet and trapped under a cupboard.Autopsy details of several victims who succumbed at Dr RN Cooper hospital have shown that they died due to “traumatic asphyxiation” after remaining trapped under the debris for hours. Minors account for 12 of the 26 victims.The three-year-old found dead on Wednesday lay buried under furniture displaced during the incident, said National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) workers at Pimpri Pada, one of the two sites struck by the mishap.READ | CM Fadnavis announces inquiry into Malad wall collapse Written by Tabassum Barnagarwala, MAYURA JANWALKAR | Mumbai | Updated: July 4, 2019 9:55:20 am Scant rain in Mumbai over next 48 hours: IMD Scanty rains in Mumbai for rest of the week: IMD Related News Advertising “She was sleeping between me and my husband. When the wall collapsed, there was water everywhere. I couldn’t breathe. Both my children were swept away,” said her mother Sharda Kurade. She and her husband took an hour to come out of the debris. Their other child, nine-year-old Abhishek, was saved by a neighbour.At Ambedkar Nagar, the other site of the mishap, local residents found from under the debris bodies of two women. They were identified as Jyotsna Bhatade, in her 20s, and her grandmother.“We found the bodies when we were removing the debris. We don’t know how many more are still under the debris here,” said Naresh Lad (28), an employee of a private company in Lalbaug.Another body recovered from Pimpri Pada was that of Pappu Shah (43), a driver. He is survived by his wife and four children who live at his home in Bihar, Pappu’s relative Manoj said.At least 72 people remain admitted across five hospitals — KEM, R N Cooper, Jogeshwari Trauma Care, MV Desai and Kandivali Shatabdi. “Patients are all stable. Few require surgery for fractures,” said Dr Vidya Mane, superintendent at Trauma Care hospital. Mumbai, Mumbai news, Mumbai rains, Mumbai weather news, Mumbai wall collapse, Malad wall collapse death toll, Mumbai rains death toll More than 20 people were killed and several others critically injured after a compound wall collapsed on hutments due to heavy rainfall at Kurar village, Pimparipada-Malad East, Mumbai, on Tuesday. (Express photo: Prashant Nadkar)A day after a concrete wall collapsed at two locations in Malad East, destroying hundreds of shanties on the hillock bordering the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation’s Malad Hill Reservoir, the death toll climbed from 22 to 26 on Wednesday. Mumbai: Heavy rain in first 10 days of July puts city close to monthly average of 840.7 mm Advertisinglast_img read more